Press here to Skip to the main content
Font Size
Default Font Size Larger Font Size Largest Font Size RSS Subscription Change Colours Sitemap Mobile/Accessible Version 繁體 简体
Subscribe to e-newsletter
Weather Traffic Conditions

3 relics declared monuments

October 13, 2017
Mixed architecture

Mixed architecture:  Tung Lin Kok Yuen combines Western structural forms with traditional Chinese designs.

Red facade

Red facade:  Kowloon Union Church was opened in 1931.

Qing relic

Qing relic:  The Yeung Hau Temple was probably built in the Qing dynasty.

Tung Lin Kok Yuen in Happy Valley, Kowloon Union Church in Yau Ma Tei and Tai O's Yeung Hau Temple have been declared monuments.

 

The declarations, under the Antiquities & Monuments Ordinance, were gazetted today.

 

Founded by Lady Clara Ho Tung and her husband Sir Robert Ho Tung in 1935 to preach Buddhism and promote education, Tung Lin Kok Yuen combines Western structural forms with traditional Chinese designs. The Buddhist temple plays a significant educational role in the Chinese community for its strong association with the early development of female education.      

 

Built by the London Missionary Society with financial support from Sir Paul Chater, Kowloon Union Church was opened in 1931. Converted into a horse stable during the Japanese occupation, it was reopened after the war and continues to serve the community to this day.

 

The exact founding year of the Yeung Hau Temple is not known, but the oldest relic at the temple - an iron bell - was cast in the 38th year of Qing Emperor Kangxi's reign. The temple is popular for its strong association with the Tai O dragon boat water parade, one of China's intangible cultural heritage items.

 

Click here for details.



Top
Conserve and Revitalise Hong Kong Heritage